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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)
often our conversations about these issues are exclusively engineering and physical science kinds of questions. those matter, no doubt. they're fundamental, but there's a social dimension to this as well, which neighborhoods are affected, which individual people are affected, and it's predictable. >> fascinating, zone "a" ev evacua evacuated, low-lying residents there were twice as likely to be residents of. >>> i want to bring in ed markey, co-sponsor of the only climate bill to ever pass the chamber of congress. congressman, what is your reaction to the stunning absence of this issue that you worked so hard on and labored over and ground out a large bill with tons of technical details to carve votes on and it's now disappeared from the political conversation? >> well, i think that -- i think that mother nature decided that she was going to inject it into this election. if it wasn't going to be raised in any of the debates, then she was going to find a way of having this be discussed. and so this election for next tuesday is now framed. it's mother nature versus the unrestrained
. but you're quite right that many scientists have been very cautious and science has a cautious culture. you could almost say a conservative culture. their peer review process discourages them from even thinking about going out on a limb. and so they -- they are inherently cautious and conservative. but the evidence is now so overwhelming. you know, in the last ten years you showed some of the statistics but there there's an analysis of the extreme hot temperatures on the surface of the earth. they're now 100 times more common than they were just 30 years ago. and it is these extremely hot temperatures that are responsible for the increased evaporation, the increased water vapor in the air the increased drought. and remember this is hardly the only climate related disaster that we've had this year. 65% of the united states has been affected by a very widespread and extreme drought this year. food prices have been affected. much of the west, including the epic fire in colorado springs was on fire this summer
that you can. so, we use those kinds of principles that are basically at the heart of a lot of science to be able to do this somewhat miraculous feet producing an accurate representation by just talking with a small fraction. host: are they accurate? guest: well, they are. polling has a very good track record of accurately predicting the elections even though that is not our main purpose. is one way we can know that polls are accurate. in fact, of all the surveys that are done it is one of the only ones that has a very clear outside way to validate all the polsters including the pew will do a final poll and put the estimates out the next week or so before the election and on election day we will find out how accurate we were. four years ago we were within one point of picking the exact mark. eight years ago we were dead on the margin. and we are not the only ones that have a good track record. most polling does a very good job of predicting how the election will turn out. host: how do you a do a poll from the beginning to the end? guest: it is a fairly straightforward process. we do se
] [ crowd chants u.s.a. ] >> cenk: i love that reaction. hey, what about climate science? u.s.a.! u.s.a.! we're number one! ha ha, take that, climate change. luckily, not everybody's that dense. new cover of business week is it's global warming stupid. we now have the author of that article, assistant managing editor of bloomberg business week joining us now. some believe this cover story is a bit controversial. do you believe it is? >> no, obviously the cover language is meant to get people's attention but if you read the story itself, you see we're playing it right down the middle. the issue here is not to blame climate change for any one particular storm but to say that the conditions in the atmosphere have indisputably changed and as a result of those changes, all storms generally speaking are going to be prone to be more severe and more frequent and we are beginning to see in undeniable terms the price of the warming of the atmosphere, the warming of the ocean waters and the rise of the ocean waters. >> cenk: paul, here's the problem with that. you say it's undeniable, all the scientist
. with advances in science and technology, there's -- health of the mother has been -- has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one's ever died in childbirth, i know what the science is exactly. what to you make of it with these claims now this shouldn't be an exception for life or health of the mother which we know most people honor those exceptions. >> they're simply not true. i thing he's been going to the todd akin school of biology. 1 in 40 pregnancies, women have pre-eclampsia. there are a number of reasons. but the point is this is not what this district is. this is a moderate district of hardworking people, and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodies. and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you so much for coming on "hardball." good luck next week. >>> when we return, let me finish with a word of warning about mitt romney's transformation in the last couple days, you know, to moderate. >>> let me finish tonight with this. it's
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. are you one of them? drink dream water, the natural, fast acting sleep aid that helps you wake refreshed. visit drinkdreamwater.com. >>> there is no electricity. people are living in shacks. growing up here makes you feel like you don't have control over your life. many children drop out of school, because they don't have school uniforms and textbooks. i realized that the only way that this area could change is through education. i'm tulani montondo. i'm helping children so we can change the community together. we help the children by paying for school books, school uniforms. our main focus is a tutoring program we run four days a week. as young people who were born and raised here, we know the challenges of the community. we come together for fun and come together for academics. >> it gives me a chance to go to the university. they are trying to pay for my fees. i also come back and help out here. a little can go a long way. >> math and science and english. >> exactly. >> i did not
as health of the mother, same thing with the science of technology, health of the mother has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one that has ever died in child birth. i don't know what the science is. what do you make of the claims and most people are. >> that's not true. he's been going to the todd akin school of biology, to be honest. in fact, one in 40 pregnancies are he can topic pregnancy where the fertilize tube and results in the loss of the fetus if you don't -- to save the life of the mother. women who have cancer and need chemotherapy, there's a number of reasons. but the point is, this is not where this district is. it's a moderate district of hardworking people and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodieses and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you. >>> when we return, mitt romney's amazing transformation, you know, to moderate. you're watching "hardball," a place for politics. ♪ this will literally probably never happen
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> you've seen the lines, the angry customers. you know the story -- there just isn't enough gasoline for everybody that needs it in the impact zone of this storm. before we go to our reporters from the latest -- for the latest from the front lines, let's take a step back and walk through the whole process from ground to pump. crude oil that is pumped from the ground is then transported by pipeline, tanker or barge to a refinery. and that's where the oil undergoes several processes, changing it into many products. but mainly for this purpose, gasoline. from there it is shipped, usually again through a pipeline, to a terminal. at th
and they did a parody of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do? the world responded as best it could. what we did, the naval maritime forces, we sent our balts group down there which was patroling the area, we sent the hospital ship comfort down. so you have the comfort on the east coast, you have the mercy on the west coast. the mercy is parked down in san diego. it just got back from its asian humanitarian assistance from guam, indonesia, vietnam, an amazing number of nations we're partnering with. those hospital ships with 1,000 beds, 12 operatin
most climate science is junk science, they even would never tie an event ike this to climate change. here's the thing that i pointed out to you, andrew, the last category 3 hurricane was wilma, that was seven years ago. this is the longest period in a century in terms of how long we've been between category 3. back in 1954, between august '54 and august of 1955, the east coast saw three different storms make landfall each of which caused twice as much damage as sandy. now you weren't born in 1954. it caused twice as much. here's the chart of the average global temperature and this quietly was reported by the uk climate office. that shows the average variability from 14 degrees celsius which is the average. there's the no discernible rise in 16 years. >> cuomo's point he was trying to stay out of the controversial subject. he said the political ban derte doesn't want to get to. his question is should new york be prepared for flooding. maybe this is a situation talked about yesterday we're building in areas we shouldn't be building in. >> the storm that caused $180 billion in damage.
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
keep being climate change designers and anti-science in a variety of ways. >> anti-science, we are still dealing with 46 million people on food stamps. we are still dealing with a 50% increase in the national debt and 100% increase in the gasoline price. now, in new jersey, they can only get 10 gallons. we are dealing with a lot of economic problems. >> part of what sandy tells us, yes, we are dealing with all of those things. that's not somehow separate about trying to get a laugh line by talking about the rising ocean. >> everybody wants to see c-130s unloading electric trucks to help them. they expect the government to show up. it is what level the government takes irresponsibilities. not enough time to see what this storm has done. >> if we keep thinking of government's response as only about response after the fact rather than thinking about the money that is saved and the policies and the fairness associated with doing disaster planning through fair governorer nance in the first place. >> you are talking about wanting a cop to do on the job. what melissa is talking about
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> i have your fox business brief. a sea of green down that wall street. a round of better expected reports coupled with strong manufacturing from china are giving market a boost. general motors is up 4.7% from last year while ford sales climbed only four tenths of a percent. ford analyst say that is due in part to hurricane sandy cunning last month sales by 300,000 vehicles. chrysler had its best sales since 2007. the irs is giving taxpayers affected by sandy some extra time to file returns and payments. they have extended the original deadline by one week. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ dagen: we have the latest update to bring it on the number of people who are still without power because of hurricane sandy. 4.6 million are still without power. the upside is at the peak 8.3 million were without power and electricity. almost 3.7 million people have had their power restored. you can look at the hardest hit states there. the number of them stil
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. so, which supeast 4g lte service would yochoose, based on this chart ? don't rush into it, i'm not looking for the fastest answer. obviously verizon. okay, i have a different chart. going that way, does that make a difference ? look at verizon. it's so much more than the other ones. so what if we just changed the format altogether ? isn't that the exact same thing ? it's pretty clear. still sticking with verizon. verizon. more 4g lte coverage than all other networks combined. >> at 25 minutes past the hour, i am updating you on super storm sandy, leaving people without power. the death toll is 18. travel is at a standstill as most major tunnels and bridges to and from the city remained closed. new york and new jersey officials said water damaged trains and buses could keep most of the system shut down for days. as a whole, more than 15,000 flights have been canceled due to the store. also here in new york, authorities are trying to figure out how to secure a construction crane that is dangling atop a high-rise. thous
. with modern technology and science, you can't find one instance. this is an issue that opponents of life throw out there to make us look unreasonable. >> jennifer: actually, congressman, i think you're doing a pretty good job of looking unreasonable on your own. fortunately, voters in walsh's district agree because the latest polls have him trailing his democratic opponent tammy duckworth 40% to 54% for her! and tonight i'm pleased to be joined by iraq war vet joe walsh opponent and congressional candidate, tammy duckworth coming to us from chicago. tammy, welcome back inside "the war room." >> thank you for having me, again, governor. how are you today? >> jennifer: i'm great and getting better all the time. it sounds like you are too. except that i understand that the tea party super pac freedom works, funded by the koch brothers has announced $1.5 million ad buy supporting congressman walsh to, you know, prevent you from beating him. how are you fighting that? >> you know, it is $1.5 million. as of yesterday a
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade.
to -- >> i know, but i'm talking about the social yol guests that write articles about science. let's check on the markets. futures are trading, but down about 61 points. half a percentage point for the dow industrials. could i make the point since we'll be looking for things to talk about today, i could make the point that statistics from labor day to the election 90% of the time if the markets up, the incumbent wins. the number of 13,090. so 17 points above where we close the day before labor day. ohio getting much closer apparently. anyway, let's look at the oil board. if you look at the s&p and how it's come down recently, a lot of the risk assets have come down at the same time the s&p has. went up on qe and once revenue started coming in it light or -- >> denniss also pointed out we could see big margin calls. >> take a quick look at currencies. or the ten year. probably down around 1.7% or so on the ten year. guess we'll go to kelly in london. you're back over there. you made it. that's good. >> i was on a flight out saturday night. i i know they started shutting town things on sunda
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. you're watching "squawk on the street" live from the financial capital of the world. opening bell set to ring in a little less than two mississinu. the man on that balcony right there. normally it is celebratory. today is more about resolve. making this thing happen amid difficulties and problems. no guarantees about how today is going to go. they are as sure as anybody expected them to be even once we started getting that surge in the new york harbor. >> bloomberg terminal is not doing that well now. that story. bob steel worked at goldman. this ubs news is moving everything august of the big international banks. this is an underreported story. >> i want to do more. hopefully within our broadcast. we have so many things to cover. i agree with you. i want to get to ubs. it does have far reaching implications potentially for what they did. hopefully we'll have more on that. >> ubs and deutsche bank. higher trades in the banks overseas. financials here on the s&p 500 is the best perfor
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> normally around this time we would talk about the opening bell doing stock chat. the markets are closed. i made a quick list this morning of broad sectors off the top of my head. travel, banks, exchanges, retailers, restaurants, insurers, and utilities. >> i tell you what will happen which is part and parcel with 2012. the quarters will be reported and everyone will use this as an excuse of why things are not so great. refining company lose as couple days. the supermarkets, we have numbers there. clearly when you went to the supermarket this weekend they were selling stock that would probably otherwise be there forever so you can restock. kroger up nicely last week in anticipation of a big rush this weekend. >> look at this note from citi. the note put out on friday detailing exposure that retailers have. most exposure to the east coast where the hurricane is going to hit. super value up 34% of stores in the northeast. you mention drugstore chain or supermarket is where people might go to stock up for preparation
social media and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his write ago peer in the asian "the wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organization around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here dr. kim. [applause] >>> thank you for your kind introduction. the curry economic institute is hon snored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partner than the edmund school of foreign services and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really i do do think that the 21st century will be seen as asia-pacific century. many of the growth will merge from the region and of course many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the perspective of asian integration and the security problems on the korean peninsula to name a few. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in the region will be critical
to pay for my fees. i also come back and help out here. a little can go a long way. >> math and science and english. >> exactly. >> i did not go to university, but i would like to help them. i feel excited. >> i'm going to be an accountant. >> i'm going to be a lawyer.
. number three -- a little can go a long way. >> what subjects do you need to learn, math and science and english! >> i feel excited. >> i'm going to be an accountant. >> i'm going to be a lawyer. >> the world that you're bringing here is bringing change. >>> back to politics. nine days out here before the presidential election. i want to share some important numbers here when it comes to the race. let's begin in virginia. you know the deal. this is one of the key swing states we've been watching. so this new "washington post" poll shows president obama with a four-point advantage over mitt romney. it's a -- a change certainly over the 1-point lead romney enjoyed there last week. heading northward to pennsylvania, the president has a six-point lead in this new poll from the "philadelphia enquirer." ho romney's gained growned since early -- ground since early october. and finally ohio, ohio, ohio, the mother of the battleground states. the four-point advantage to obama. the latest cnn/orc poll. you have the polls and numbers, but we want to hear directly from the voters. we sent the cn
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> one of the biggest storms ever to hit the united states continues to roar across the northeast, bearing fierce wind, pounding rain. the toll so far, 10 deaths along our northeast corridor, massive flooding in coastal towns, major cities, all commercial air and rail travel at a standstill. at least 5 million homes without any power. at this hour, 50 million folks in the storm's path are wondering when will the danger finally be over in i know of no better person to ask than our meteorologist for the latest from the extreme weather center. >> reporter: you know, it will be a couple of days before the threat is completely over. the storm is certainly going to ease in its intensity and the wind field, while it spreads out, the winds will be less intense the next couple of days. but we still have threats. take a look. this storm got down to 940 millibars of pressure, that's the lowest we have ever had, north of cape hatteras, north of that outer point in the outer banks. we have never seen a s
. we don't even know how the satellite system works. we don't know a damn thing about science. put us in charge. to which i say hell, no! all right. now, when we come back, one of the guys who was in charge was michael brown. you remember brownie, heck of a job. he will be on the show. he's got a unique criticism of the president. he says that president obama reacted too fast to this storm. that should be a very interesting conversation when we come back. >> brownie you're doing a heck of a job. the fema director is working 24/7. [ applause ] >> cenk: we've got plenty more elbows for the last one came from. we have another one end at the of the show. try to guess this ononononononononononononononononononononononononononononononon >> cenk: we're getting our first look inside the tunnels under the east tunnels. the lirr. it has been flooded and as you can see it is a disaster area. literally. and how they even get the trains rolling again or how soon they will is, of course, very much an open question. and
ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> breaking news on hurricane sandy. we go now to mayor ragusio of little ferry, new jersey. a town completely flooded after a levee broke last night. he joins me by phone. mr. mayor, thank you for joining me. >> good evening, piers. >> your town has 10,500 people. you have been hit very, very hard. astounding flooding we have seen there in the last 24 hours. here's the big question, i guess. the town was not under an evacuation or flood warning, i understand, so how and why do you think this happened? >> absolutely. we were informed at around 2:00 a.m. by e-mail while we were sitting at oem headquarters, the police station, there was a levee break in moonachie in the meadowlands area. that would explain to us the incredible surge of water that absolutely overtook us. but we have many, many questions. i'm going to demand answers. i'm told the army corps of engineers will be in again tomorrow to further inspect and one thing is for certain. this can never happen again. as the meadowl
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> gold having its worst day in four months, dipping below $1,700. prices closing rights now. sharon epperson tracking the action at the nymex. what's the issue, sharon? >> traders says it is more than fearso fearso fearsome friday that is taking gold prices down. the low of the session, $1,675 an ounce. that looks tonight closing price here. that fact we're seeing this sharp slide has a lot to do with the relative strength we are seeing in the dollar. after positive factory orders that we got, the jobs report also strengthening the dollar and causing a lot of trader to wonder if we really will see stimulus action taken effectively. also of course we have the election on tuesday and once that uncertainty passes, if there's still a lack of risk appeti appetite, traders say we could see much lower prices. look for $1,670, the 200-day moving average as the next key support level. >>> let's get to trader action here at the nyse as well. bob pisani joins me on the floor. >> i think sharon's got it right.
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> bob pisani, a big interview with the head of the new york stock exchange with a big opening. bob, take it away. >> the important thing all systems are go, so far. new york stock exchange, nasdaq, everyone saying they are going to be open. joining us on the phone, duncan niederauer, ceo of the new york stock exchange. duncan, good afternoon. >> bob, how are you doing? >> terrific. so it's all systems go? can you walk us through what happened this morning? you gave us an update yesterday. tell us how met with this morning and how you came to the conclusion everything was going to open as normal? >> yeah, sure thing, we appreciate you letting us be on again today, too. so, first of all, we had to make sure we got through the evening and that we got through last night's high tide and this morning's high tide in lower manhattan so we've had people on site throughout the evening. and we got the report this morning that there was no -- there was n
workers better than anybody else in the world. i want to recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers because we know that's an area where we can't afford to fall behind. i want to train 2 million workers at our community colleges for the skills that businesses are hiring for right now. and i want to work with colleges and universities to make sure that tuition does not keep on going up because our young people can't afford the debt that they're taking on. and that's something we can do. number four, my plan will reduce the deficit by $4 trillion over the next ten years in a balanced way. we're going to cut out spending we don't need. we have already cut out a trillion worth of spending. we can do more, but i'm also going to ask the wealthiest americans to pay a little more so we can invest in the research and technology and education that will keep new jobs and businesses coming to america. and under the guise of reducing the deficit, i will never turn medicare into a voucher system because no american should have to spend their golden years at the mercy of an insurance company. and
sandy. superstorm sandy. before we get to the science of the unprecedented storm, which is fascinating, i want you to see a timeline straight from the cameras of our cnn ireporters. take a look. >> no. >> rushing water across the streets. going into homes. nypd is setting up their boat. search and rescue later. evacuation plan a. >> look at the storm from our ireporters. we want to look at what makes sandy so intense. this professor is host of sci-fi science. you say it is a result of several things coming together. >> the hurricane from hell was created by a collision of three large air masses creating e ini animal we have never seen before. we have a hurricane off the coast of florida. then you have the jet stream from the arctic going all the way down to florida, colliding with this hurricane. and then you have another storm coming in from the west. the merger of three large air masses created a new animal, the likes of which we have never seen before. >> it is fascinating because when you look at, oh, it is a cat 1 hurricane, on paper that doesn't look so bad. >> you can't use the
view, not science, just your gut, are we living in a time unlike times of the past? >> the simple answer is absolutely. i've never seen anything like this. i mean, we're having an annual storm of the century. it is just crazy. >> i spoke with an official at the electric powers research institute. he said building a power grid that could withstand these kinds of storms is just not economically feasible. so how best to deal with these changes remains to be seen. >> go back to those numbers for a second. he predicted a surge of 11 1/2 feet. >> which would have been the highest ever, it was closer to 14. and there's a piece in the paper trying to figure out is it climate change what's going on? the temperature in the western atlantic, 5 degrees above normal for the end of october. there's something going on. >> harry smith. and by the way, harry's going to have more on a special "rock center with brian williams" tonight 10:00/9:00 central right here on nbc. >>> let's get a check of the weather now from al. >> thanks a lot, matt. a show of hands, who has been stuck in new york? where a
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. dennis: a quick word about the broken window fallacy. number of public officials said there will be a building boom with a growth as we rebuild from the devastation. understand it never lives up to the growth without a disaster. it is nice to take a good view but doesn't work. cheryl: we are tracking transportation whether it is airport or subway or rail and getting services back and seeing a headline across the delta airline research operation thursday at la guardia so piece by piece. dennis: that means la guardia will be
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. wooohooo....haahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! i'm gonna stand up to her! no you're not. i know. you know ronny folks who save hundreds of dollars switchinto geico su are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than a witch in a broom factory. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. ashley: pictures worth a thousand words. the storm moving in. this is a picture of the southern tip of manhattan did zone a has already been evacuated. the brunt of the storm coming in later today. the equity markets are closed today. they are also closed tomorrow. they say we intend to reopen our rockets on wednesday. conditions permitting. we will have to keep an eye on that. we have deadly winds that could be gusting up to 90 miles per hour. melissa: this guy did not look like that even an hour ago. it was literally the calm before the storm. it just keeps getting darker and darker and darker. president obama and governor ro
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)